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6 Reasons Your Bad Boy Mower Isn’t Getting Fuel

Your lawn mower begins to run sluggish or maybe it doesn’t run at all. This could be the result of your mower not getting fuel. There aren’t too many items on a Bad Boy mower fuel system to check when you suspect your mower isn’t running right because it isn’t getting sufficient fuel.

A Bad Boy lawn mower may not get fuel when old fuel has gummed up the fuel system and restricted flow in the fuel filter, fuel lines and carburetor. A fuel restriction may also be caused by a bad fuel pump or bad fuel cap.

Below I identify the items you need to check on your Bad Boy to find a fuel restriction. Make sure you follow all safety precautions as outlined in your owner’s manual before working on your lawn mower.

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Follow all safety instructions provided in your equipment operator’s manual prior to diagnosing, repairing or operating. Consult a professional if you don’t have the skills, knowledge or are not in the condition to perform the repair safely.

Reasons Your Bad Boy Mower Isn’t Getting Fuel

Bad or Old Fuel in Your Bad Boy Lawn Mower

Bad Boy lawn mowers offers gas and diesel powered lawn mowers. Most of the mowers in Bad Boy’s lineup use gas so I’ll address that first.

Old Gas in Your Bad Boy Lawn Mower

Because gasoline can begin to breakdown and become less effective as soon as 30 days after purchase, it’s important to use the gas and not let it sit around. Most gasolines on the market today include ethanol.

Ethanol is a corn-based fuel added to gasoline to make it more environmentally friendly. While ethanol is okay to run in most vehicles today, it is not good for small engines. Ethanol attracts moisture from the air. This solution can cause gummy buildup and corrosion in the fuel system and engine damage when the solution separates and runs hot.

Only use an unleaded gasoline with a minimum octane rating of 87 and maximum ethanol content of 10 percent. The lower the ethanol content, the better it is for your engine. Read more about the right type of gas to use in your Bad Boy mower here.

If you are unable to use gasoline within 30 days, add a fuel additive to stabilize the gasoline and reduce moisture. I use the product Sea Foam Motor Treatment in each tank of fuel to minimize the bad effects of ethanol. I share more about the advantages of using Sea Foam here.

Old Diesel in Your Bad Boy Lawn Mower

Diesel, like gasoline, can breakdown from exposure to air and moisture. Over time, it can form gummy and solid substances. Bad diesel fuel will appear dark in color and can cause corrosion and blockages in the fuel system.

It’s necessary to purchase diesel at a busy fuel station. Not only should the fuel station be busy, it should be busy with diesel fuel customers. Don’t make the same mistake I have. I purchased my diesel fuel from a well-known fuel station in the area that was always busy.

I didn’t pay attention to the type of vehicles that were filling up at the location. It wasn’t until I had to change my fuel filter on my vehicle when I noticed it was black. Since then, I have used a fuel station that has dedicated diesel customers.

Not only should you pay attention to where you purchase diesel, you should also make sure you store any diesel away from moisture, light and heat. Add a fuel additive like Sea Foam to stabilize your fuel so it lasts longer.

Bad Boy Fuel Filter is Plugged

The fuel filter is installed on your Bad Boy mower to strain the fuel before it enters you fuel system and engine. It prevents dirt and solid substances from passing through the filter. Check your fuel filter for a fuel blockage. Replace the filter if you find it is plugged or dirty appearing dark in color.

When installing a new fuel filter, make sure the arrow on the side of the filter is pointed in the direction of the fuel flow. This means the arrow must be pointed toward your carburetor and away from the fuel tank.

Clogged Fuel Lines on Your Bad Boy Mower

The gummy substance that forms when running old fuel can block the fuel lines preventing the mower from getting fuel. To find a blockage in the fuel line, stop and start your fuel flow while checking each section of line using the fuel shut-off valve or hose pinch pliers to crimp the line.

To check a section of fuel line, stop fuel flow and remove the end furthest from the fuel tank and place it in a container. Turn on your fuel supply and watch for fuel flow. Make sure the container is placed lower than the fuel tank. Fuel cannot run uphill without a fuel pump.

If you find a fuel restriction, fully remove the section of fuel line and spray carburetor cleaner into the hose to loosen the clog. Follow this by blowing compressed air into the line to remove the blockage. Repeat as necessary. Replace the fuel line when you are unable to remove the clog or if it is dry and showing signs of cracking.

Bad Fuel Pump on Your Bad Boy Mower

Your Bad Boy lawn mower uses a vacuum style fuel pump to build pressure off the engine and push fuel to your carburetor. The mower requires a fuel pump because the carburetor sits higher than the fuel tank. It needs a pump to move fuel against gravity.

Look to see if the fuel pump is leaking. Fuel can degrade the pump over time and cause it to leak and fail. If you find leaking, replace your fuel pump. If you don’t see any signs of leaking, check to make sure your fuel pump is operating correctly.

Make sure you are getting fuel to the pump. You may have already done this when looking for a clogged fuel line. If not, refer to the section above to check for fuel flow from the fuel line connected to the fuel pump inlet port.

After confirming you have fuel to the pump, shut off your fuel supply and remove the fuel line from the carburetor. Place this line in a container, start your fuel flow, start your mower, and watch for fuel flow. If you find a steady or pulsating flow of fuel into the container, your fuel pump is working fine. If not, replace the fuel pump.

Dirty Carburetor on Your Bad Boy Mower

The carburetor on a Bad Boy lawn mower regulates the amount of fuel mixed with air to form a combustion in the cylinder. The carburetor components can stick or clog from old fuel leaving behind deposits that prevent the carburetor from working as designed.

Before you start pulling apart your carburetor to clean it, perform these couple checks to help isolate the fuel restriction to the carburetor.

  • Confirm you are getting fuel to the carburetor by making sure you don’t have fuel restrictions in the fuel line or fuel filter. You also need to confirm you fuel pump is working correctly.
  • Pull your air filter out of the air filter housing and spray carburetor cleaner into the air intake. Start your mower. If it starts, runs and then shuts off, your fuel restriction is most likely in the carburetor.

Disassemble and clean your carburetor using the steps in this article. If you prefer to have someone else take your carburetor apart and clean it, take your mower to your local small engine repair shop.

Clogged Bad Boy Mower Fuel Cap or Rollover Vents

The fuel tank a Bad Boy mower is designed to vent through either the gas cap or the rollover vents. When the vent becomes clogged and no longer allows air to pass freely through the vent, your fuel tank can act like a vacuum. Fuel will no longer be able to flow from the cap preventing your mower from getting the fuel it needs to run.

If removing your fuel cap allows your mower to run fine, but installing it and letting your mower run a while causes the mower to stall, you may have a clogged vent. Determine which type of vent you have on your Bad Boy mower and replace it.

Bad Boy Mower Still Won’t Start or Run

You’ve checked and repaired all the items above for a fuel restriction, but you still have a starting or running problem. Check out the following articles for more information on finding your starting or running problem: